So your art got rejected. Laugh at it.

If you are one of my close friends, you know that I am very competition with myself and my art. I am a painter. So when someone doesn’t ‘get’ my work, I can at times get frustrated. Not so much as I used to. The first rejection I ever got was from a student show. It had me so mad I couldn’t see straight. I was livid, but looking back on it now, it was hilarious to expect them to accept a ‘wet’ painting than I just finished, because I had procrastinated until the last two days. It was my first oil painting so that goes without saying, I had no idea what I was doing. It was a healthy thing to experience and to learn a little humility. After all, my family and friends had been telling me for years I was “GREAT!”. So why couldn’t the jury see it? The cold hard fact was that I was NOT VERY GOOD. We need to grow on encouragement from our friends and loved ones. My recent rejection was to an exhibition of work known for being so far away from what I do that if I did get accepted it would have been an anomaly all on it’s own. Like Han Solo said, “Never tell me the odds!”. Don’t let the odds keep you from entering your work if you want to. That word “want” is important. Submit if you think you want your work in an event. This was a local museum and I really loved one of their most popular recent exhibitions, so I thought, “Fuck it, let’s enter.”. I had no reservations that I would be an outlier if chosen, so when I didn’t get in, I laughed at myself. Rejection is good for growth. It is necessary, so relish it, laugh at it, and drown your frustrations with your favorite beverage. However, ask yourself, was it your best work? If it is at this current time, shake it off and move on. If deep in your heart you know it wasn’t, then begin to ask yourself what you need to do to get your art to that level. Easy said than done, but if you can honestly look inward to see your own deficits as a painter, then the journey to becoming a better painter is a little clearer. Competition is healthy, even in art. It helps push you beyond your comfort zone and boundaries. I know it has helped me grow as a painter tremendously, but I have to laugh off rejection and so should you. It’s ok to be a sore loser at times. Get mad, get upset. Yell and scream. Give the art establishment a big “FUCK YOU!”. Shake it out of your system and move on to becoming a better painter. Because you can’t make great work from loathing and regret. It’s toxic and it will eat at your soul.

The art world is notorious for its cliques. Find your own group of eccentric artists and create your own clique. Gauguin and Van Gogh did. Okay, it didn’t really end well for them, but you get the point. Photo: SNL Chris Farley as “Matt Foley”, motivational speaker. He lives in a van down by the river.

The art world is notorious for its cliques. Find your own group of eccentric artists and create your own clique. Gauguin and Van Gogh did. Okay, it didn’t really end well for them, but you get the point. Photo: SNL Chris Farley as “Matt Foley”, motivational speaker. He lives in a van down by the river.

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Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

Hobbling into the New Year fresh from surgery!

A new year, a new outlook! I’m starting the new year recovering from foot surgery. It’s been a painful long two years of walking and standing. It sucks, but I am looking forward to moving forward to getting better and moving on with my work. What happened to my foot? Well, the short story is I had plantar fasciitis. I managed in pain for a year spending a lots of money of specialized shoes, inserts, boots, splints etc before I got a cortisone shot. Things got better, or so they seemed. After slowly building incorporating excercise back into my life, I started to notice that pain started to evolve on the top and side of my foot. THREE DOCTORS LATER, various X-rays, CAT Scan and an MRI, I was told that I had three torn tendons. It would require surgery and I now here I am, recuperating during the holidays not being able to drive and limited hobbling around. The good news is I and recovering and I am looking forward to running and being a dad who can play with his kids at the beach. My buddies Mark and Mike were super awesome to help bring me to last nights Norfolk Drawing Group for painting night. It felt good to be out of the house! First painting of 2019. “Anastasia” 12x16 oil on canvas. 

A great night painting the pier!

 “Night Beckons the Fisherman” 16x20 oil on canvas. Was an awesome night listening to Led Zeppelin and talking to the occasional tourist. Met a group of students from Mongolia who were nice enough to watch my gear while I went to my truck. When I came back they were taking pics of themselves posing behind the easel! Had a fun time and was really happy with the results of the painting.

 

Comment

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

Latest Digital Paintings with Procreate

I have to say that with creating new brushes using Procreate has allowed me to bring my digital painting closer in line with my traditional oil painting. All of the standard brushes are nice, but going beyond those and customizing and creating new brushes has really allowed my work to evolve in new and exciting ways. That said, I am happy to say that my new digital paintings will be available to purchase very soon. Below are a few that I hope you will enjoy with some time-lapse videos to see the a little into the creative process.

My first digital portrait of Heather using my new newsprint brush I created to use in Procreate.
A digital portrait painting using Procreate with custom brushes.
Comment

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

Featured paintings from my solo exhibition

Here are the new paintings featured in my solo exhibition. Contract me if you are interested in purchasing one. Show runs until the end of June 2018.

 
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Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

BRAND NEW SHOW! BRAND NEW PAINTINGS!

BRAND NEW SHOW! BRAND NEW PAINTINGS!

Doug Clarke

Solo Exhibition

Sandler Center For The Performing Arts Gallery 

Opening Reception April 18th 6-8PM

2nd & 3rd Floor

201 Market Street

Virginia Beach 

Free & Open To The Public

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A solo exhibition, an art thief, and no sleep.

As promised, I’m finally having a moment to write down the events related to my show for you to read. The Pavilion I gallery solo exhibition was my largest show to date and final tally was 80 paintings! And I was worried about hitting 40 when I first accepted, funny right? Setting up was a real roller coaster of emotions. First obstacle was finishing a couple of large paintings that I wanted to get in for the show. But the catch on the large one was I using a new paint that I was not familiar with. Even after a month of sitting on the easel, the damn paint wasn’t drying. Not even close! It felt as wet as the day I laid it on the canvas. Framing was also stressful, thanks to a snow storm and a cold freeze that prevented the snow and ice from melting away. That meant that FEDEX delayed my delivery by several days.  After three days of framing and staying up late with only two or three hours of sleep.  Finally I get done and load up 78 (which really turns out to be 79 because I forgot one) into the truck. Can you say stressed out? Here I am with a truck loaded up, going down the freeway praying I don’t get hit by another car!  Spending most of the day loading and unloading my truck and placing paintings across 6 floors, I finally left to go home. 

I would later discover I had 79 paintings inside. Whoops!

Just the first floor wall! Five more floors above.

    The next day I get a text from the gallery coordinator and she is asking if I have removed a painting. I text back “NOPE” and then called her. “Slave I” from the 31 day challenge last year was swiped right off the wall after it was hung an hour early! My immediate thoughts are that this has to be a StarWars Uber fan as the painting didn’t even have a title card posted yet! After a few minutes of thought I decided to post on FB. I mean, what the hell do I have to loose? Right?

"Slave I" Stolen!

What happens is an immediate avalanche of shares on FB to my amazement. Friends have even shared on StarWars fan sites and message boards. Thursday comes and I am in need of a painting to replace the stolen one. I’m still pissed about the stolen painting. Then an idea hits me as I’m talking to my friend Sam and that night after everything else is done, I begin painting Boba Fett. If you’re a fan of StarWars, you know that replacing a painting of Boba Fett’s "Slave I” with a painting of Boba Fett is significant. After all, Fett is a bounty hunter in the movies. Staying up till 4am to finish, I got to sign and titled the painting “Run & Hide Scum, I WILL FIND YOU!”. A clear message to the thief in the case he frequents the building. Next morning, I have to run and buy a frame for the new Fett painting. Then go attach labels to the work hanging at the gallery. Seventy-nine labels across six floors is a lot of work. 

"Run & Hide Scum, I WILL FIND YOU!"

    Somewhere in between that, I get a call from somebody who says their employee has my painting. He asked where I am and said that he will have the thief deliver the painting back to me. I told him that I was at the place where the painting was stolen at. He says good and the thief will be there in 20 minutes. Let me tell you it was a long 20 minutes! All I could think about was making sure I didn’t miss him walking in. Luckily the building superintendent showed up minutes before the thief did. As the culprit walked in, he tried to bolt for the elevators before I stopped him and told him to turn around. I pulled my camera out and shot photos of him directly holding my painting. There he was, standing with the stolen painting, the guy that had called caused me so much stress the past few days. I asked him why he stole it. I asked him why he didn’t contact me with the website address printed on the back. I told him if he wanted the paining so bad, I would’ve gladly worked out a payment plan for him so that he could own it. He just said that he was sorry and he made a mistake. He said he knew it was wrong the minute he stole it. I asked him “If you knew it was a mistake why didn’t you reach back out to me and tell me so?”. I told him I didn’t think he was that sorry because he waited until he was caught. I proceeded to chew him out and then demanded that he go upstairs and look at the replacement painting. As we were in the elevator I asked if he thought his parents would be ashamed if they knew what he had done. He replied, “Yes”. I asked him how old he was and he said, “23”. Then I asked him, “You do know this was a felony right?”. He looked down and sighed. We got to the floor and I made him walk up to the paining and look at it. There was Boba Fett hanging on the wall. I then told him to look at the title of the painting there on the small label and read the following “Run & Hide Scum, I WILL FIND YOU!” title. The thief‘s head dropped down. His face turned sour like someone who’s just been punk’d on TV. I told him I thought he would be back and painted this just for him in case he just happened by again. After some more of me chewing him out, I told him to leave and sort the rest of his day out. I would later learn that he was fired after returning to work. After finally getting all of my labels done and deciding to hang the returned stolen painting below the replacement, I headed home to shower and change for the show. 

Boba Fett gets his revenge! 

 

    The evening came and managed to return back just in time for the exhibition to start. After everything was said and done the opening reception was a blast. I did my best to try and talk to everyone and manage sales of paintings. Best of all, was knowing I had made it through the week and I could relax for a day. 

Opening reception night!

She is checking out the 79th painting I forgot to count!

    Sunday I remembered that I needed all new work for my next solo exhibition in mid March. I’m writing this now as I know it will be awhile before I surface and come back up for air to post another blog. Now back to the easel with my largest painting to date finished and drying with many more left to paint!

Even the local paper got involved with the story!

Nobody steals Boba Fett's ship and gets away with it! 

 

    

1 Comment

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

Thoughts on Digital Painting

My first digital painting using Procreate of my son drawing.

My first digital painting using Procreate of my son drawing.

I have spent a great deal of time and thought on trying to convey my thoughts on the digital art form as a medium on equal level to traditional media. But after multiple writing and rewrites, I have come to the simple conclusion that perception of this medium may never change without thoughtful discussion and dialogue. Yes, traditional media is an original work of art; however, does it demand a higher price? Due to it's exclusivity, yes, I believe so. But creating digital art is a direct equal to painting. The same thought process and demanding mental awareness occurs. Being in the zone in front of the canvas with brush is the same as me holding a tablet and stylus. The exact same. Sure, there are apps that claim to emulate oils, watercolor, pen and ink, but they are invariably different from the real media they are trying to copy. The tools that the app developers make are unique unto themselves. 

My daughter sleeping. I was able to paint this during a flight to San Diego on the plane. If only I had this during all my commutes on the DC Metro Orange Line!

My daughter sleeping. I was able to paint this during a flight to San Diego on the plane. If only I had this during all my commutes on the DC Metro Orange Line!

Why does digital art have a stigma? It's likely because of the art published that was traced, or painted over in some program like Photoshop. Apps that make photos mimic paintings through programmed filters are very popular. It's easy to see why artists feel threatened by this. I totally understand why some collectors or even artist themselves don’t want anything that can be mass produced. Rather they desire something that is handcrafted, one of a kind. After all, a digital drawing can be mass produced with ease. But let me argue this point, fine art has been reproduced for a long time. So what’s different with digital art? If drawn and rendered by the artist, is it not art to be appreciated and admired? Some artist go the route of only reproducing limited prints or even limit it to one digital art print. What's the difference between that and a clay sculpture made from a cast? 

Nick's Restaurant

Nick's Restaurant

A plein air study from the shelter of the Monticello Arcade archway during a rain storm.

A plein air study from the shelter of the Monticello Arcade archway during a rain storm.

Norfolk Light Rail

Norfolk Light Rail

Will the digital art form ever rise to the level of traditional methods such as oil, watercolor and pastel? There are many artists that use the digital medium. Is it because it's ability to reproduce an exact copy each and every time? Andy Warhol made reproductions and used the argument that with each pass, the image itself changed, making it a unique piece. Thomas Kincaid made mass reproductions of his work with people embellishing paint on the print to make them individualized. I won't make any other comparisons to these artists, but you get my point, slight alterations can make anything "unique".

Over the past year, I have been approached by people wanting to purchase the digital art I've created. Some people are unaware that the artwork is digitally made. I truly believe that my drawing, color, design, and composition have been improved by digital painting. I have been perplexed with how to reproduce it in a way that is ready to hang. It is been quite frustrating to know that prints of my traditional paintings purchased by friends are still boxed up, unframed years later. I myself am guilty of this and know that the cost of a frame can be at times more than the cost of the print. There are services for printing digital art ready to hang with out the fuss of going to a framer. I look forward with seeing how the results pan out.

Let's look at the benefits of digital painting. I have found an outlet to create visual comps for ideas to paint and flesh them out. With the assist of a television to project them on, I can see if they will work as a large scale painting. Seriously, how cool is this? For oil paintings that I personally am stuck on, digital painting over a photo allows me to work out ideas to complete the painting and solve problems. Plein air digital painting is even being offered now by artists that work professionally in movie and gaming industry. The digital art form is a tool and medium unto itself and deserves equal respect for those that choose to create work in it.

Plein air study from Norfolk Waterside Marriott.

Plein air study from Norfolk Waterside Marriott.

Imagined street scene of Hong Kong using Zen Brush II.

Imagined street scene of Hong Kong using Zen Brush II.

I created this study and then used this as a guide to create a larger painting with oil paint.

I created this study and then used this as a guide to create a larger painting with oil paint.

Another study based from my sailing experiences.

Another study based from my sailing experiences.

2 Comments

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

How to be ready to go out and paint plein air at a moments notice.

How to be ready to go out and paint plein air at a moments notice.

Ever been out painting and forgotten to bring your brushes or paints? Leaving home without the critical gear to paint can be challenging or even disastrous. With the right preparations, you can be ready to paint at any given moment you want without the fear of leaving gear behind. 

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Upcoming Solo Show Exhibition Opening Reception!

MY SOLO EXHIBITION RECEPTION! I'm really excited and hope to see you there! 

IMG_0329.JPG
Comment

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

My 31 Daily Painting Challenge!

January 1st I joined a 31 daily painting challenge hosted by Strada Easel.  I wanted to jumpstart my painting and had heard of this challenge last year.  The rules are paint from life (no photos) everyday.  It was an extremely challenging process to figure out a subject to paint.  Some paintings were started and abandoned due to time or work, which meant if it was plein air, I had to start all over again that evening.  During this challenge I learned that I really should embrace still life subjects more as they are a great way to study light, composition and values when I can't be outside painting plein air.  Most of the paintings were done in an hour and half to two hour range.  After getting home from work, cooking and getting the kids to bed it usually was 10pm.  Some of the paintings I wouldn't considered finished paintings but astute life studies.  Not all of them are successful, but the constant painting everyday has greatly improved my confidence and helped me rely more on intuition an instinct.  If you have not considered this challenge, I would highly recommend you should if you are looking to improve upon your painting skills.  Below are the paintings in chronological order.  For those that followed me on Facebook and Instagram, thank you for your daily support and encouragement!  Thanks to Bryan Mark Taylor for hosting this challenge, I really enjoyed the process and challenge of daily painting.  

 

 

Day 1

Day 1

Day 2

Day 2

Day 3

Day 3

Day 4

Day 4

Day 5

Day 5

Day 6

Day 6

Day 7

Day 7

Day 8

Day 8

Day 9

Day 9

Day 10

Day 10

Day 11

Day 11

Day 12

Day 12

Day 13

Day 13

Day 14

Day 14

Day 15

Day 15

Day 16

Day 16

Day 17

Day 17

Day 18

Day 18

Day 19

Day 19

Day 20

Day 20

Day 21

Day 21

Day 22

Day 22

Day 23

Day 23

Day 24

Day 24

Day 25

Day 25

Day 26

Day 26

Day 27

Day 27

Day 28

Day 28

Day 29

Day 29

Day 30

Day 30

Day 31

Day 31

Comment

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

My latestest painting working with a limited palette, "Beach Trotting" 18x24 oil on canvas.

I’ve really been enjoying using just the prime colors of Blue Ultramarine, Alizarine Crimson, Cadmium Yellow Light and Permalba White. In using this, I find that I have don’t have to rely on using a mother color or mud to help harmonize the colors used in the painting. However, the real challenge is to get reds to really pop as I would get using a Cadmium Red. I’ve also noticed when needing a dap of yellow when mixing darker tones, if I use too much yellow, the results are muddy and I have to start over. It also means I rely heavily on white throughout all my lighter tones of color. Either way, I am having a lot of fun painting with this limited color scheme. It will be interesting how my nocturne paintings comes out using this as well. Stay tuned!

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My Online Storefront is stocked fresh with new paintings!

I'm excited to announce that I have updated my store front and have new work up available for sale!  To celebrate the kick off, I am discounting all available work 20% thru the end of August.  Be sure to join the mailing list at the bottom of the site for exclusive notification of new works too!

Discount Promo Code: MI84QXP2016-20
Good thru August 31st, 2016

Comment

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

Finding inspiration when in search of outdoor painting subject

I don't know about you, but I really get stoked on the freedom to go out and drive looking for a spot to paint.  The excitement of discovery and seeing something in the moment.  I don't know how else to describe it except that it fits the surfer in me looking for waves to ride.  Something is out there, I just need to wait a let it come to me naturally.  Both of these paintings are typical of being open to my surroundings and when the time is right, I set up and get painting.  Painting smaller and being more mobile allows for instantaneous decisions like trying to paint a setting sun over the harbor.  Forcing a spot to work for you and your painting usually makes for a bad painting and it turns painting into a chore.  It should be a passion.  Driven and determined to lock down with paint on canvas the visual emotions laid out before us.  I'm not interested in capturing exactly what I see, but rather how I feel about the moment and the surroundings I find myself in.

Comment

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

ROCK ISLAND PLEIN AIR WORKSHOP!

I am pleased to announce I will be teaching a two day plein air workshop on Rock Island, Wisconsin.  July 6th & 7th

"Join us as we learn the basics in painting outdoors using oils with Doug Clarke.  In a two day workshop, Doug shares his knowledge on how to observe the outdoors and give feeling and life to complete your paintings.  Set within the rustic landscape of Rock Island State Park off the tip of Washington Island, students will have the opportunity to capture unique lake views and historic structures.
Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings. A painter of "en plein air", Doug is known for capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.
Graduating Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art. In pursuit of mastering his craft, Doug participates in local and national plein air events. 
Awards include 1st place at Plein Air 757, Williamsburg Plein Air and Plein Air Mount Lebanon competitions. Doug is a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His works have found a home in local and international collections.  Doug is represented by Harbor Gallery, Ellen Moore Gallery and the Richard Stravitz Gallery."

Workshop Cost $175

Sign up:
Washington Island Art & Nature Center
(920) 847-2025 Hours: Monday-Saturday 10:30-4:30 Sunday 11:30-4:30
(920) 847-2657 After Hours
wiartandnaturecenter@gmail.com

Materials list and syllabus available on artist site:
www.liquidmethod.com/workshop

 
Comment

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

Getting my act together with goals and time management.

So it's been a week and I wanted to let you know what I've been up to this past few days.  With my new goal, I’ve been thinking about what direction to go with my painting.  So far here’s the list.

  1. Painting bigger studio works, smaller plein air and still life.
  2. Marketing and promoting better
  3. Exploring avenues in which to sell and reach more collectors

If you read my previous blog entry, I’m setting myself on the projected path to painting full time.  It’s something I feel I’m ready to take on.  With that said, it will take a lot of time management skills on my part.  So I started researching what are good resources to become better at managing my time.  For those that know me, if you had to describe a characteristic about me, I’m guessing you would say that I look tired.  It usually is followed with I drink lots of coffee.  It’s true I’m always tired, staying up late to paint is tough, but I recognize that I need to manage my time better so that I can squeeze in more time to sleep.  

This is where I have my lunchtime siesta.

This is where I have my lunchtime siesta.

One thing I have adopted early on is bringing my lunch to work so I can eat and sleep in my truck.  It helps that I park in a garage, so finding a dark spot to park in is easy.  I tune in to an iPhone app called Nosili that allows me to create custom nature sounds to provide a white noise to block out the car alarms, delivery trucks and other distractions one would hear in a parking garage.  I try to stick to a routine in the car by listening to NPR instead of being on my iPhone while I eat and then switch to Noisli and power nap for 20min.  Believe it or not, I can hit R.E.M. in this amount of time.  This leaves me refreshed and ready for the rest of the day.  I also have a second canister of coffee in the truck to drink when I wake up too.

My Nosili App

My Nosili App

As for managing my time more efficiently, I’ve done my research and the first book recommended to read is “Getting Things Done” by David Allen.  The reviews are really good, so I’m hoping that I can get some groundwork laid to be more productive with my painting.

 

So, I’ll leave you with my photo dump of past things from last week.

2 Comments

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

You mean you're not a full time artist?

Yes, I have full time gig that pays the bills.  For some, it's a sign of failed artist.  The stigma of a "part time" painter is perceived as one who didn't make it, or worse, isn't good enough.  Granted, every time I show my work to people while I'm doing the day job, I almost always get, "What the hell are you doing here?".  Well, if you must know, I'm here so I can provide healthcare and a steady income for my family.  If you are reading this and follow other artists, you might be surprised some of them also work a full time or part time job.  Unfortunately, most of us have experienced at one time or another, someone telling us we aren't real professional artists because we don't paint full time.  Other times, it's an artist who has established a career that is condescending towards those who can’t make that leap yet.  But I certainly can attest to many amazing painters who have been more than gracious sharing their time and knowledge with me.  My own personal reasons for not being open about my day job is that it invites people wanting my professional opinion, when I’d much rather talk about art and painters that motivate and inspire me.  Why then, might I be bringing this up now?  Well, I know there are a lot of other painters who share the same dream of having a successful full time painting career as I do.  I thought it would be great to share my own experiences with others.

I didn’t go to college to become a painter.  When I graduated with a BFA in computer graphics & illustration, I was even more confused about what I wanted to do.  So here I am, in my 40’s knowing exactly where I want to be in life, and I feel a lot of anxiety.  Most of it comes from not knowing if my mark as a painter will reach it’s full fruition.  I’ve made a lot of progress in a short time, but I’m restless and know my best work is yet to come.  To paint at the level I want to be at will take an enormous amount of time and effort.

So I hope that you enjoy reading about my painting adventures and my own personal insight as I continue to evolve my art career into a full-time profession.

4 Comments

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

My painting experience with Spike Lavender as a medium.

After listening to friends with their own switch to safer painting methods, I decided to go to try nontoxic methods with my paints. A good idea since my daughter, who is three, now spends more time in the studio with me. Recently, I learned a close friend had gotten ill due to the exposure to turpentine.  My first venture into this was with the M. Graham Walnut Alkyd Medium.  I liked it, but getting the oil thin enough to spread around fluidly was not happening.  It dried fast and left a nice gloss to the finished oil painting.  Using this as my sole medium made a difference in the odor of my studio and I became aware the gamsol on the few occasions that I did use it and found I preferred not to use gamsol if possible when painting.  Leaving it in an open brush washer does make you exposed to it’s vapors.  I decided move on to explore other options.  During trips down to my local Jerry's Artarama, I discovered several nontoxic mediums to use with my oil paints. One that looked the most appealing was Chelsea Classical Studios spike lavender. The claims by the manufacturer stated spike lavender is a safe historic alternative to turpentine and the chronic health problems associated with it.  It also promoted that spike lavender is used for aromatherapy and has calming effects. I should have become wary with one of the listed benefits of spike lavender was for “well-being”, but I was too intrigued with it’s benefits.  So I dived in, cleared out my remaining gamsol out of the brush cleaner container and poured in the Spike Lavender.  Immediately, the smelled dominated the entire studio.  I began painting and found it to be as good to mix with as turpentine.  I really began to enjoy it’s performance as it broke down even my thicker paints with ease.  However, after 40 minute into the session, I couldn’t take the smell anymore.  Tried to hang in with odor as best as I could, but my senses were literally overloaded from the vapors.  Even my sweater had absorbed the odor and smelled like it had been soaked in the medium.  I closed the lid and the next day returned to find my studio was still reeking from the powerful presence of the Spike Lavender. Having thrown out all the rags, I wondered what why the smell was still so prevalent, and then it occurred to me to smell the painting.  The painting itself was loaded with the powerful odor of spike lavender.  A week later and the smell was still as strong as the day I painted with it.  To my dismay, I realized there was no way I could sell a fresh painting directly to a buyer in this state.  My wife was already complaining of the studio every time she entered the room.  Begrudgingly, I threw the painting in the trash outside.  It took over a week for the smell to fully dissipate.  Maybe I wasn't using it correctly and should have kept the lid on as much as possible or maybe it wasn't designed to be used with thin washes?  One thing positive about the Spice Lavender was it's ability to break down paint to allow for thin washes with oil.  For that alone, it worked incredibly well.   I rationalized keeping the Spike Lavender in some form even if just to use as a brush cleaner, after all, the stuff is expensive.  Luckily, for me, the gracious folks at Jerry’s Artarama were more than happy to return my purchase, those guys are awesome and always looking out for me.  It took almost seven days for the studio to be free of the odor of the spike lavender.  After further research, I came upon some documentation that indicated that I might be susceptible to an allergic reaction.  After discussing with several artists who experienced similar reactions, it left with the conclusion that this was not the medium for everyone.  So I began to search for other methods to paint in the least non-toxic manner possible.  As of this writing, I have purchased Gamblin’s Solvent-Free Gel Medium and look forward to trying it on my paintings very shortly.

26 Comments

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

Get a chance to win a 3hr Plein Air Painting lesson with me!


Lesson Donated by Doug Clarke
Supplies Donated by Kathy Rust

Unleash your inner artist and learn the classic technique of Plein Air (French for “open air”) painting in the great outdoors. Explore the effect of light on objects, use of color and compositional elements with celebrated local plein air painter Doug Clarke whose recent commissions include both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters. 

Choose your favorite Hampton Roads location to paint such as your house, favorite street, beach or your personal Pixie Hollow and work alongside the artist for 3 hours in order to complete one 8”x10” painting. Also comes with a gift basket of art supplies to keep up your artistic practice at home. All materials for your painting will be supplied... just bring your enthusiasm and your inspiration! 

Mutually agreeable date TBD. Must be scheduled by end of June 2016. 

Comment

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.

Chasing the light after a week of rain.

"Restless" 9x12 oil on linen.

I need another two plein air paintings.  It’s submission time for some of the plein air events, and I don’t feel I have the pieces I need.  It’s been rainy, cold and occasionally snowy.  Worst of all, my strongest paintings are not of cloudy overcast days, I need the sun to peek out.  I’m painting on a studio piece today with my gear ready to leave in case the sun peeks out today, so the forecast is predicting.  It looks like it will rain, so in my effort to jumpstart my fitness challenge after being almost two weeks of sick, I decide to run four miles.  Mind you, I haven’t run in a while and even then my runs were a mile in recent months.  After the first lap around my neighborhood, it begins to torrential down pour on me.  At least it is 60 degrees outside.  As I make my way around long run, I look up in hopes of a fast moving sky to indicate it could clear by afternoon.  It’s raining so hard though I can’t tell what it’s doing.  I’m soaked to the bone by mile eight and exhausted.  No chance of sun in the next hour, I clean up and get back to my studio painting. 

An hour later, I pop the garage door open.  Another hour rolls by and nothing.  After lunch though, the sun peeks out for a fraction of a second, giving me hope.  Back in the studio glimpses of the sun come and go, but I look out and see a small patch of blue sky on the horizon.  On the weather app, it says that the cloud cover will push off over the Atlantic.  My chance to paint today is looking better.  By three pm, the sun has just broken and I have less than three hours of light.  I realize now I have a delay, no small panels to use.  Luckily for me Jerry’s Artarama is just down the street, time to pack up and go.  It takes me 15 mins to get my panels, longer than I wanted.  Somehow on my decision to go the marina to paint, I’ve chosen the wrong route and I deal with almost 40 minutes of traffic to get to there.  I am trying to stay focused with every jam and construction obstacle I encounter. 

I will have about two hours left of light, on my way to the marina, but I realize I will passing the Little Creek train yard.  If I am lucky an engine or two will be there, so I take 10 minutes to detour down the backroad and muddy potholes to take a look.  Plenty of cars with no charisma or color and no engines, back to plan A, the marina. 

Five minutes later, I get there and I have to see what is the best subject to paint.  The boats are always in a constant state of rotation, so most of what I saw last time I painted here as changed.  Back and forth between the fishing boats, the boat lift and the dry docked sailboats.  Ten minutes later, I decide to go with a hard docked sailboat.  It has the most going for it composition and light wise, plus I know what the light and shadows will do as the sun goes down.  I set up and begin to lay in my underground painting.  Five minutes later I realize it’s too big and centered, wipe away and start again.  Trucks are going by slowly as I know they are trying to figure out what the hell I am doing.  I stay focused and ignore the cars and the people walking by to the restaurant next to me.  The composition is almost done, but it needs something else.  A orange cone is near by in the shade, so I walk over and place it in the foreground, but not to obstruct any cars.  The cottage houses with their A Frame roofs are going to be too busy, plus with the light quickly fading, I decide to leave them out of the rough in. 

Once I start laying in paint, I am very aware of the creeping shadows that are now threatening to rob me of color and light in just a short time.  In the span of an hour, critical thinking and gut reaction takes over.  I glance to the back of the restaurant and notice a group of workers on the their smoke break.  I need a figure to make this painting work, so off I go to get one of them to stand in for me to gesture in.  I get even more lucky as the guy eagerly volunteers, mentioning he has worked in the boatyard a few years.  I tell him where to stand and for a two minutes he blends into the scene as if it were his boat that he was working on.  I get my few strokes to imply a figure and get back to work.  The shadows are creeping in and I have to focus on the masses and save all the minute details for later, if there is time.  I debate on the color of the sky and decide to reach for the thalo blue to get that warm late afternoon sky.  A few minutes of mixing and I get the right color.  The hull of the boat is tricky because of the sharp lines and no room for error without a serious wipe away, but I learned a few tricks on my own the last time and they work out here perfectly. 

It’s the last fifteen minutes of light for me, the sun has about twenty five minutes but the shadows will reach my scene before then.  Furiously, I work on the details of the rudder and the propeller that I am just now noticing.  Funny how details aren’t discovered till near the end.  I get the mast and a couple rigging lines, add detail to the back of the fence and mass in the foreground.  Add the telephone poles, random clutter in the background and sharpen up the shadows and darken where needed.  Detail the figure again and add scaffolding.  The shadows are covering the boat now and it’s now down to the last details I can muster before the cold sets in.  I have not dressed appropriately and the chill quickly starts to affect my hands.  By sunset, I’ve finished enough to pack up go home and add the last details to the railings, telephone wires and other small stuff.  By the time I do get home, help out with the kids homework, eat dinner, tuck them in bed, iron clothes, and wash dishes it's midnight.  I add  final details, sign and shoot the painting, import and color correct, and then call it a day.

Comment

Liquidmethod

Doug Clarke is an award winning Plein Air and Studio painter based out of Virginia Beach. He works in oils creating plein air and studio paintings.

Graduating with Honors and Magna Cum Laude from Virginia Commonwealth University, Doug's work has evolved from commercial to fine art.  As an active member of the Norfolk Drawing Group, the painter strives for excellence in his figure drawings and paintings.  His commitment to life drawing and painting led him outdoors to paint "en plein air".  There he realized his passion for capturing light and nature in his own personal way.

Doug has been commissioned to paint both Harborfest and Neptune Festival posters for 2014.  Awards include 1st place awards for Plein Air 757,  Williamsburg Plein Air and the Plein Air Mount Lebanon quick draw competitions, as well as a three time winner of the Historic Fort Monroe Plein Air Exhibition.  His paintings are collected far and abroad internationally.  Doug’s work is currently represented by Harbor Gallery and the Ellen Moore Gallery.

In pursuit of mastering his craft, he has participates in local and national plein air events

When painting outdoors, Doug is very passionate about capturing the vanishing landscapes of Southeastern Virginia.